Of the 34 competition venues, eight underwent some permanent works, seven were totally temporary and nine were constructed as permanent legacy venues.

Since the 2000 Games in Sydney, men have competed in a 12-team tournament and women in a 10-team one.

In its 100 years of Olympic existence, hockey has been essentially dominated by one country.

Hockey is the oldest known ball and stick game: records exist of it being played in Persia in 2000 BC.

The name “hockey” probably derives from the French “hocquet”, or shepherd’s crook, and refers to the crooked stick which is used to hit a small ball.

After a first appearance at the 1908 Games in London, hockey became a firm fixture on the Olympic programme as from the Antwerp Games in 1920.

Women made their entrance in this sport in 1980 at the Moscow Games.

The competition venues were clustered in four zones – Barra, Copacabana, Deodoro and Maracanã – and connected by a high-performance transport ring.

Nearly half of the athletes could reach their venues in less than 10 minutes, and almost 75 per cent could do so in less than 25 minutes.

The Rio 2016 emblem is inspired by the organisers’ vision, which is: “All Brazilians uniting to deliver the greatest festival on earth and proudly advancing our national promise of progress.” It has, as its essence, the concepts of passion and transformation, which both reflect modern-day Brazil.